“Your Belief in God is Merely an Escape from Your Monotonous, Stupid and Cruel Life”

“You all believe in different ways, but your belief has no reality whatsoever. Reality is what you are, what you do, what you think, and your belief in God is merely an escape from your monotonous, stupid and cruel life.”

“You can change your mind, your opinion, but truth or God is not a conviction: it is an experience not based on any belief or dogma, or on any previous experience. If you have an experience born of belief, your experience is the conditioned response of that belief.”

“Belief is a denial of truth, belief hinders truth; to believe in God is not to find God. Neither the believer nor the non-believer will find God; because reality is the unknown, and your belief or non-belief in the unknown is merely a self-projection and therefore not real.”

Jiddu Krishnamurti

For the most part, the places I happen to go on the net discuss god in a limited and perhaps superficial way.  That is, they discuss god as if god were a being rather than an experience.  Moreover, they often limit their discussion of this being to whether or not it exists and to whether there are any moral consequences to us if it exists.  In other words, the philosophical basics.

There’s nothing wrong with the philosophical basics.   Hell, it’s almost like a rite of passage or a test of some sort to be wrapped up in the basics: At a point in your life, usually in your adolescent years, you think of god as a being and wonder whether that being exists or not.  That’s just something you do.  That most of us do.

And by mid-life, it seems if all goes well, we have figured out that god is an unnecessary hypothesis, that deity is not needed to explain anything.  Congratulations, we have passed the test.

But then along comes some mystic like Krishnamurti who, if you are still able to listen to him or her with an open mind, like you would have listened to them as a child, will tell you that your beliefs about god — regardless of what those beliefs are — are so much bullshit.  For make no mistake about it: He or she might say, “…your belief in God is merely an escape from your monotonous, stupid and cruel life”, but they mean that even your disbelief in god is merely an escape from your monotonous, stupid and cruel life.  Regardless of whether you are a theist or an atheist, your ideas of god are bullshit, says the mystic.  Hell, even if you are a mystic, your ideas of god are bullshit, says the mystic.

What do you do now?

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16 thoughts on ““Your Belief in God is Merely an Escape from Your Monotonous, Stupid and Cruel Life”

  1. The mystic would then be missing one undeniable fact. Disbelief in anything is a lot less work than belief in anything. In other words it takes me nothing to disbelieve in something (unless of course I have to waste time finding evidence to support my disbelief because believers of that cause are lazy). Not to mention there is nothing holding me to my disbelief. I can move onto another disbelief or even start believing again if evidence and reason are presented. Whereas most people that believe in something are less willing to challenge said belief.

    But I think the last line of that third paragraph is really summing up the entire quote. If that is the case, then the only issue I have is that god’s existence or lack there off is reality one way or the other. There may be variations of the two, but at a high level one of two must be the case.

  2. Hi Webs! Let me begin by thanking you for stopping by and thus rescuing me from a dull and boring evening! Much appreciated! 😀

    I think we need to distinguish between disbelief and non-belief. It seems to me that you in your first paragraph above are actually talking about non-belief, even though you use the word “disbelief”. I say that because I have noticed that people can invest just as emotional energy into disbelieving something as they invest into believing something. They can be just as passionate at the one as at the other.

    One the other hand, when one has a simple non-belief, one has a lack of belief one way or the other, and there is, as you say, “a lot less work”. Basically, it’s as if you never heard of the subject in the first place and so you don’t have an opinion one way or the other. It’s like that.

    Next, I agree with you that last line more or less sums up everything Krishnamurti is getting at. And I think you are right to say that god either exists or doesn’t exist. But that is a separate issue from whether we can comprehend god, which is what Krishnamurti and the blog post are really talking about.

  3. Yes, non-belief would probably be a better way to phrase, that is what I get for commenting late at night.

    I think I see the point. It doesn’t matter if we believe or not because any belief is not real even if god does exist. I would imagine that point doesn’t go over well with the believers.

  4. Yes, Stephen, but you are no fundamentalist, you are no literalist. You are not seeking to make an idol of beliefs. Although you are too stubborn to admit it, you are pretty sophisticated in matters religion. On the other hand, Webs is right — the ideas in this post are probably not acceptable to many fundamentalists of any religion, Christian or otherwise. That would be my guess.

    • Having read your response, I wonder if you are implying there’s something wrong with not accepting the ideas in this post. Also, is there something wrong with being so conditioned against receptivity that the ideas in this post inmediately get rejected by say, a fundamentalist belief structure?

      Put shortly, are you making a stance on rightness and wrongness with respect to fundamentalism vs the avant-garde?

      Because if so, well… you’d be in the wrong, although that would be alright ;).

  5. Belief in God is indeed a bit self-contradictory. How can one possibly hope to validate the existence of that which he also claims to be unable of understanding?

    And why even try, if there is no situation where one would possibly need to decide whether or not to “let” God be?

    Logically, it simply doesn’t matter. It is entirely an emotional subject matter, and all its worth comes from emotional factors.

    I don’t see disbelief in God as quite as contradictory, but relying on the truth of its inexistence would be a bit troublesome as well. Logically, there is no way to know whether there is some sort of non-interfering God. It makes sense to assume none, but one should be recognize the different between simple disbelief and actually knowing that there is none.

  6. Luis, it is great to see you here!

    Let me quote you:“Logically, it [belief in god] simply doesn’t matter. It is entirely an emotional subject matter, and all its worth comes from emotional factors.”

    Would you say that’s because the concept of god is not required to explain anything? i.e. God is an unnecessary hypothesis?

  7. Paul: I’ve been lurking.

    Luis: The imagination is mostly emotional, so the existence of “God” is mostly emotional, as well. The only thing the concept of god would help to explain is the strength of attachment some have to their imagination, as opposed to reality. Perhaps a diagnosis of some disease?

    Peace.

  8. Leguru: I mostly agree, but rigorously speaking it might be that God does exist yet is suspiciously discreet.

    Paul: Thanks. Yes, it is an unnecessary hyphotesis, AFAIK at least.

  9. What you do now, is use your mind, heart, and body as best you can to achieve whatever it is that you want. Because, you only live once, you only have the time of now to be, and become. You only have what you have to live and deal with. So, get rich!…because you know deep down that you want to be free from all the bullshit in the world that financial freedom can help you let go of. All the nonsense political games you have to play to make a buck, all the agreements you have to make to further the deal. Just look at Krishnamurti and all the books and talks and things that he espoused…..he didn’t do them for free. He lived a luxurious life in California, thanks to his theosophic fame which was a story cooked up by the theosophists to validate their mystical teachings and claims. He, Krishnamurti, was used as a pawn early in his life, and he made it his mission that no one ever will be again….ever. So once again, get rich or find out what brings you peace and stops the confusion.

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